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Monday, 13 February 2017

Foods And Ageing

Certain foods can contribute to the ageing process in different ways.

SUGAR
In a study, subjects visually five years younger than their actual age had the lowest intake of sweet, sugary treats. 
A theory that is gaining in popularity is the idea that sugar contributes negatively to the skin and overall ageing process. It is believed that, sugar (or glucose) creates ‘Advanced Glycation End (AGE)’ products in every cell and molecule in the body, creating inflammation.
Dietitian Helen Bond comments: "Leading health organisations are recommending that we should all be reducing our intake of added sugars throughout our life-course to benefit our health, but for many people telling them sugar may be contributing to their wrinkles and they will be far more likely to put down the doughnut."
CAFFEINE 
A study found younger-looking people had the lowest intake of caffeine. Dietitian Helen explained: "It is an old chestnut, but making sure that you are adequately hydrated is vital for healthy skin.  
"Drinking plenty of fluid gives skin the necessary moisture to help maintain its’ elasticity. Plus, it helps to clear the body of toxins and carry vital nutrients to cells."
But there is good news for our other favourite diuretic: alcohol. Frequency of alcohol seemed to have no effect on visual ageing. 
However, volume of alcohol did, so if you want to keep wrinkles at bay, it’s ok to have that post-work glass of wine, but drink only in moderation.
If you're in the market for a caffeine-free tea, try Dragonfly Tea's Wild Honeybush brew. This rare South African tea is made from Cyclopia bush, native only in botanically rich south-western Cape.  
Unlike conventional teas which are made from the Camellia family, Honeybush is naturally caffeine free, and - like rooibos tea - was pioneered by settlers who built their homesteads in this remote and rugged region, making tea using the local indigenous plants. 
MEAT
During a study, across all participants there were no observations for better skin amongst vegans or vegetarians. 
The visually youngest participants were more likely to consume the recommended one portion of oily fish a week.
Helen said: "Omega-3 is found in abundance in oily fish, such as herring, mackerel, sardines, fresh tuna and salmon, and has a plethora of skin and other health benefits. 
"I always recommend it to clients prone to dry/itchy skin with redness and they see an improvement in just a few weeks."
If you are not a regular fish eater, perhaps because you don’t like oily fish, there are plenty of omega-3 rich supplements that provide skin-loving, anti-ageing benefits on the market.








Source:express.co.uk/life-style/diets/600925/How-to-get-rid-of-wrinkles-eating-diet-sugar-caffeine-bad-for-you

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